Cardboard Chair | The Annual Children’s Review

Starting off the Spring semester with a bang, RISD Industrial Design sophomores were once again tasked with creating a child’s chair from cardboard. This project brought together teams of three to brainstorm, prototype and finish a chair in one week’s time.

The chair had to be cut from one piece of 48″ x 80″ cardboard and support at least 55 lbs. A wide variety of construction methods, from laser cut rocking chairs to single sheet folded animal chairs, were used by teams to meet these requirements. Students experimented with techniques of structural integrity to account for the physical nature of children’s play and the wear and tear of repeated use. Many of the chairs were playful in function, offering children the opportunity to interact with them in different ways.

The following are images and boards from the projects.

Pablo Velazquez, Phil Lee and Lizzie Suh.

Gavin Atkinson, Sue Kim and Gabriela Colon

Angela Lee, Kebei Li and Barbara Yang

Tom Chang, Jen Wibowo and Denise Thornberry

Anna Kang, Mollie Conlee and Callil Capuozzo

After presenting the projects internally, the sophomore class received the most honest, helpful and insightful critique of their work by seven visiting children. The kids were asked to play, sit and interact with the chairs without knowing about the class watching from a webcam in an adjacent room. This proved to be hilarious as the children went to town breaking some chairs, changing the purpose of others, but offering some amazing insight into how a child interacts with objects around them. At the end of the day, the children chose their favorites and got to take them home, signed by the designers.

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Posted by Callil Capuozzo | Date Posted: 05 March, 2012

7 Responses to “Cardboard Chair | The Annual Children’s Review”

  1. Haha we're not allowed on the roof anymore — but we did do an egg drop inside the ID Building. It was pretty messy….

    Reply
  2. Esther

    I love these designs! the castle one is amazing, even though i can't imagine all those delicate little details and figures would be particularly durable..

    Reply

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